THIRD CIRCUIT RULES DRIVING UNDER INFLUENCE OF MARIJUANA IN VIOLATION OF PENNSYLVANIA LAW IS REMOVABLE OFFENSE

Written by: Taher Kameli, Esq.  In the face of Congress’ general inability to reach consensus and enact immigration legislation, and President Trump’s anti-immigration policies, immigrants have turned to the judiciary, in particular, the Federal courts, to protect immigrant rights.  However, the Federal courts cannot be viewed as a guaranteed safeguard for immigrant rights in each case. This point was made clear in the May 28 decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in the case of Sambare v. Attorney General of the United States,

DENVER MAYOR PROTESTS LEGAL IMMIGRANTS BEING DENIED CITIZENSHIP FOR MARIJUANA JOBS

Written by: Taher Kameli, Esq. Oswaldo Barrientos emigrated to the United States from El Salvador when he was a baby 29 years ago.  He received his green card at age 13 and currently remains a legal immigrant in the United States. Barrientos has no criminal record and a stable job.  Does he seem like the type of person who should be rejected when he applied for US citizenship? You probably would think no, but unfortunately such is not the case.  Barrientos in fact was recently denied US citizenship, and told that he “lacked moral character”, because

IMMIGRANTS WHO ENGAGE IN “MARIJUANA RELATED ACTIVITIES” MAY BE DENIED U.S. CITIZENSHIP

Written by: Taher Kameli, Esq. Do you regard people who use marijuana, solely based on their marijuana use, as lacking “good moral character”?  Probably not, but unfortunately, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has adopted a different position.  Under a “Policy Alert” issued on April 19 by USCIS, a person who engages in certain “marijuana related activities” may be considered to not have “good moral character” and thereby may be denied U.S. citizenship. To become a naturalized citizen of the United States, an immigrant must demonstrate that he or she had “good moral character” for